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When to Replace Bike Tires Plus 3 Reasons Why It's Important

When to Replace Bike Tires Plus 3 Reasons Why It's Important

CYCLIST ON GRAVEL BIKE RIDING OVER ROCKS

How Often Should I Replace My Bicycle Tires?

Typically you will replace your mountain or road bicycle tires when:

1. They are worn out

2. You're not happy with way your bike is performing and you think new mountain or road tires will help.

MOUNTAIN BIKER CATCHING AIR OVER A DOWNED TREE

Reason #1 - Safety

A common question is: How long do Hybrid or Road tires last? The conventional wisdom is that your road bike tires last anywhere from 1,000 to 3,000 miles. High-end (more expensive) tires should last at least 2,500 miles. Racing bicycle tires, which are designed for speed and high-performance, may need replacing after 1,000 miles, but tough bicycle touring tires can last as long as 4,000 miles. The most common sign that your bicycle tires should be replaced is a sudden streak of flat tires.  

Bicycle tires wear with age, too. If your bike is stored your tread will not wear out but your tire can harden and crack with age. If your bike tires are cracking or fraying do not ride your bike until you're replaced your tires. We also recommend when you replace your road or mountain tires you should replace the inner tubes also.

As rubber wears away there is less and less standing between the inner tube and the junk on the road or goat heads on the trail.

There’s a reason tears and tears are spelled the same way. A rip in your tire is often the end of that rubber’s usefulness. If you’re on the road, you can temporarily boot a tear with a folded up dollar bill or the boot included in the Tire Book Patch, but once you get back to home, it’s time to do some shopping and replace that tire.

You can often identify a tear before it’s an issue by checking your tires regularly for bulges. If you see something growing that looks like a tire tumor, there’s a weakness in the rubber and it’s only a matter of time before it tears and your tube suffers a blowout. Replace the tire before your next ride or you might have the other tears which we would hate to see you have. 

When it gets to the point that every stray piece of glass, rock, etc… is costing you a patch it’s probably time to make a change. Before installing your new tires keep in mind you can install tire liners which help prevent flats.

MOUNTAIN BIKER THROWING ROCKS FROM REAR TIRE

Reason # 2 - Control

right bike tires for your bicycle, the first thing to know is what size you need. To determine this, simply look at the side of your tire where you'll find a size marking or a tire label with the tire size on it. Common sizes include 26 x 1.5; 26 x 2.0; 700 x 25c or 29x 2.35. There are many tire sizes so be sure to write it down before ordering on-line or going to your local bike store.

When you replace your mountain or road tires, you must match diameters, so if you have 26-inch wheels, only 26-inch tires will fit. You can usually change widths, for example, switching from a 26 x 1.5 tire to a 2.0 model puts you on a wider tire that holds more air, which you might like for more comfort, traction and control. Conversely, someone who road rides might switch from 700 x 28c tires to 23c tires to save a little weight for easier climbing and faster acceleration. While, if you were suffering frequent flats and a rough ride on narrow tires, you'd benefit by switching to wider tires for more control and comfort

Keep in mind that not all rims and bike frames accept all possible tire widths. Usually going up or down one or two widths will work. If you're considering a big jump up or down contact us to get recommendations.

MOUNTAIN BIKER CATCHES AIR OFF A ROLLER IN THE WOODS

Reason #3 - Peace of mind

We often get asked should I rotate my Mountain or Road Bicycle Tires?

Your rear tire will likely wear at a much higher rate than your front because a majority of your weight is on the back wheel and it’s responsible for your acceleration and drive. That means you’ll probably need a new rear tire long before you need a new front tire, so let’s talk tire rotation.

You never want to put a worn tire on your front wheel. I know it’s tempting, but your front tire’s traction is responsible for your steering and braking. Can you imagine losing  traction and crashing? (Ouch). Losing traction on your rear wheel is much easier to save and you just look like you were doing a sick whip skid. So, if your rear tire’s worn but your front’s in decent shape, you can move your front tire to the rear, buy one new tire and pop it on your front wheel!  You’re good to go! 

NINER RLT 9 RDO CLOSEUP OF FRAME

What is the average cost for bicycle tires?

If you are a mountain biker for example, mountain bike tires will probably cost between $30-99 USD. Keep in mind, there are numerous tread patterns, widths, wheel size variations that you have to be aware of.  It's the same for road bike tires there are tires that have flat protection or puncture resistance available which typically will cost more but well worth every penny.

Fortunately, manufacturers have pulled out all the stops to provide excellent bicycle tires for all purposes. From built-in armor for puncture protection to supple casings that conform to the road surface for incredible handling, to dual-compound tread that's durable on top for long wear and sticky on the sides for grip, today's tires offer an impressive array of features and benefits. Manufacturers like Maxxis, Giant, Continental, WTB, Schwalbe, Surly, Serfas, Kenda and Tioga and many more have spent years developing strong, durable and reliable tires.

 

Now, pop on that new tire and tube because miles of adventures are waiting for you.   It's Your World, Ride it!

We want to make sure you have all the information you need to select the correct size and model. If you have any questions or would like recommendations please contact us at Info@BicycleWarehouse.com.

If you enjoyed this article share it with a friend and leave us a comment. 

 

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